Tag: editor

Featured Author: Kim Suhr

On Sunday, October 29th the Broadway Theatre Center’s lobby will be filled with published Wisconsin authors before, during, and after performances of Renaissance Theaterworks’ production of SEX WITH STRANGERS. The authors appearing from 1:00pm to 5:00pm on Sunday are: Cari Taylor-Carson, Christi Craig, Kathy Lanzarotti, Mel Miskimen, Pam Parker, Lisa Rivero, and Kim Suhr. They represent memoir, non-fiction, humor, and short stories.

As an advance introduction to the authors, Renaissance (RTW) asked them questions related to their writing and some of the conflicts presented in the play SEX WITH STRANGERS by Laura Eason.

Kim Suhr

RTW: Can you describe your current book? What genre is it? What do you like about that genre? And what other kinds of writing do you do?

KIM: Maybe I’ll Learn is a collection of sometimes poignant, sometimes funny pieces about the early days of parenting. It’s always fun learn which of the essays resonated with individual readers. They share their own stories with me, and soon we don’t feel quite so alone (or incompetent!). I currently write fiction, and I’m searching for a publishing home for my short story collection, Nothing to Lose & Other Stories.

 

RTW: How important is it to you that your friends, your partner, your family members read and like your writing?

KIM: I’d like to say not important at all, but those people have fantastic taste, so the corollary if they don’t like it…well, enough said.

 

RTW: Are you traditionally published or self-published? What do you think are the pros and cons of self-publishing?

KIM: Maybe I’ll Learn is self-published, though I have other individual stories that were published through the traditional submission-editorial process. I love the control that self-publishing gives writers. We get last say on the cover, the edits, the price. Everything. The flipside of this control, however, is the responsibility that goes with it–specifically marketing-wise. Most writers I know aren’t particularly keen on singing their own praises, and I’m no different (as evidenced by that last statement).

KIM SUHR is the author of Maybe I’ll Learn: Snapshots of a Novice Mom and Director of Red Oak Writing, which supports writers through workshops, critique groups and author readings. Kim’s work has appeared most recently in Literally StoriesThe Other Stories PodcastFamily Stories from the Attic (Hidden Timber Books, 2017) and other publications. She holds an MFA in fiction. (kimsuhr.com)

 

Follow these links to learn more about: Renaissance Theaterworks, SEX WITH STRANGERS, & Wisconsin Romance Writers.

 

 


Featured Author/Editor: Kathy Lanzarotti

On Sunday, October 29th the Broadway Theatre Center’s lobby will be filled with published Wisconsin authors before, during, and after performances of Renaissance Theaterworks’ production of SEX WITH STRANGERS. The authors appearing from 1:00pm to 5:00pm on Sunday are: Cari Taylor-Carson, Christi Craig, Kathy Lanzarotti, Mel Miskimen, Pam Parker, Lisa Rivero, and Kim Suhr. They represent memoir, non-fiction, humor, and short stories.

 

As an advance introduction to the authors, Renaissance (RTW) asked them questions related to their writing and some of the conflicts presented in the play SEX WITH STRANGERS by Laura Eason.

Kathy Lanzarotti

Done Darkness: A collection of stories, poetry, and essays about life beyond sadness is an anthology about the triumph of hope over hopelessness for those with depression or other mental illness. These narratives, from multiple award-winning authors, reflect the daily battle with various forms of depression: clinical, postpartum, and reactive, just to name a few. Real life plays out on the pages, depicting empty nests, grief, missing children, contemplating suicide, postpartum anxiety and more. Readers will connect, think, laugh, and maybe shed a sympathetic tear while gaining a better understanding of their own experiences or perhaps of a loved one.

RTW: What inspired you to write? What kinds of fiction genres do you like reading?

Kathy: I was a quiet kid which meant I spent a lot of time observing and I noticed all of these little dramas unfolding around me and they got more interesting as I got older. These little everyday stories are the stuff of literary fiction which is my preference, although I also love horror and spy novels.

RTW: What would it mean to you to see your book for sale in an airport terminal shop?

Kathy: I think that seeing my book out in the wild would mean that it was an official book, one worthy of reaching the masses. But, as authors, we do what we can. I must confess that I have on more than one occasion slid a copy of Done Darkness into a hotel bookshelf, and there is a copy currently floating around France on a river boat.

Kathy Lanzarotti is the co-editor of the anthology Done Darkness. Her work has appeared in Creative Wisconsin and (b)OINK zine. She is a WRWA Jade Ring Award winner for short fiction.

Follow these links to learn more about: Renaissance Theaterworks, SEX WITH STRANGERS, Wisconsin Romance Writers.

 

 

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Steps to Landing a Literary Agent or Book Contract

with Phil Martin 

Saturday, Dec 9

(Registration Deadline: Mon, Dec 4)

When faced with approaching agents and editors—in person or virtually—many writers get paralyzed. Is my work ready? What should I say? Where do I begin? This interactive workshop will help emerging novelists (or nonfiction book authors) develop a successful plan to increase confidence and win over a literary agent or acquisitions editor.

The workshop will cover:

1) developing a strategic checklist to manage the process

2) finding and approaching the right agents or editors

3) preparing the query, the synopsis and the pitch

4) following up in a professional manner

9:30 am – noon

Red Oak Writing ~ 11709 W. Cleveland Ave, West Allis

$50

$45 (students & current Roundtable participants)

 

To register, complete form & send check to Red Oak Writing, PO Box 342, Genesee Depot, WI 53127

kim@redoakwriting or 414-881-7276 for info

 

Philip Martin, director of Great Lakes Literary and Crickhollow & Crispin Books, is experienced in all aspects of publishing fiction and nonfiction book projects. Phil is a past acquisitions editor for The Writer Books (affiliated with The Writer magazine), where he worked with many prominent authors, agents, and editors, and managed The Writer’s Handbook annual directory. He has also developed books that have won national indie-press awards. In addition, he is lead instructor for the annual Novel-in-Progress Bookcamp, an intensive week-long novel-writing retreat, May 20-26, 2018, in the West Bend area ( www.NovelBookcamp.com ).

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What’s my (Log) Line?

This happens all the time: a term new to me comes up in conversation; then it seems to be everywhere. Take for example, “log line.” I heard it in the Path to Publication workshop with Elizabeth Evans, then in our Roundtable as we tried to figure out the difference between a log line, a pitch and an elevator speech.

savethecatWhen my son came home from school with the assignment to write a log line for his school film assignment, I decided it was time to learn more. Fortunately, he had brought home a copy of Save the Cat! The Last Book on Screenwriting You’ll Ever Need by Blake Snyder. As a “spec screenwriter” (someone who had to sell the idea of his screenplay before he ever wrote a word of it), Snyder’s livelihood depended upon his ability to write effective log lines.

Below are some of his suggestions in Chapter One: What Is It?

Very simply, a log line is a one-sentence answer to the question, “What is it?” A “winning” log line includes these components:

 

 

Irony

What comes at the end of the sentence would not normally be anticipated from the beginning. It is the sense of irony that hooks the reader.

Examples from Save the Cat!:

“A cop comes to LA to visit his estranged wife and her office building is taken over by terrorists.” (Die Hard)

“A businessman falls in love with a hooker he hires to be his date for the weekend.” (Pretty Woman)

Try it: Can you describe your book using the natural irony of the situation to grab your reader’s interest?

A Compelling Picture

The reader must be able to “see” the whole movie [book], where it begins and where it ends—or at least the potential for its direction—in the log line.

Examples from Save the Cat!:

“She’s the perfect woman—until she has a drink.” (Blind Date)

“A just-hired employee goes on a company weekend and soon discovers someone’s trying to kill him.” (The Retreat)

Try it: Can you write a sentence that captures the beginning-to-end scope of your book?

A Killer Title

The best ones encompass irony and tell the tale. The following titles leave you with a strong sense of where the movie will go even without watching it for one minute.

Examples from Save the Cat!:

     Barbie Goes to Hollywood

     Airhead Apparent

     Legally Blonde

Try it: What would someone not familiar with your story picture from the title alone? Play with different options that might be stronger than your current title.

Audience and Cost

When pitching a movie idea, being able to communicate the target audience and the scope of the cost is vital.

Examples

The Breakfast Club

  • Five high school students, all different stereotypes, meet in detention, where they pour their hearts out to each other, and discover how they have more in common than they’d thought.

(Audience will be teens; cost of production will be minimal since detention doesn’t require special effects or        locations)

Jurassic Park:

  • During a preview tour, a theme park suffers a major power breakdown that allows its cloned dinosaur exhibits to run amok.

(Audience: pre-teens and older; High cost: the theme park and cloned dinosaurs are going to cost a pretty penny)

Certainly, we want everyone to read our book, but we should have a very specific intended readership, and, while we can’t know cost of production, we can indicate how “big” we envision our books to be. This can be done by including “comps,” titles of other books that are in a similar vein to yours. (Be careful of comparing your first novel to the hottest title on the bestseller list, however!)

Try it: Can you write a sentence that implies the intended audience and “size” of your book?

Of course, Snyder’s advice is for screenwriters. Your book may benefit from a different type of log line—less “Hollywood,” maybe—but the exercise of trying to meet the above criteria and delivering it every chance you get will not only make your log line stronger; it will help you sharpen the writing itself.

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